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Posted on May 23, 2019 in Alzheimer's/Dementia, Mental Health Awareness, News, Other Resources, Relationships, Resources, Therapy

Support for Alzheimer’s Disease

It can be difficult to cope when your friend or family member is affected by Alzheimer’s Disease, but there are ways in which you can help him or her. You can improve their quality of life with your efforts and be a proud caregiver. Ideas to support a loved one who has Alzheimer’s Disease Learn as much as you can about the disease. If you are made aware of how Alzheimer’s affects the brain and body, you can anticipate emerging symptoms and be ready to deal with them. Reach out for support. You can access support and information from support groups, classes and family members who are battling the same to provide additional care tailored to suit your patient’s condition. You can also make use of the tips that they provide to carry out your daily activities more efficiently while also acting as a caregiver. Connecting with others facing the same problems as you can help alleviate your stress and anxiety.  Prepare yourself. Patients with Alzheimer’s may have emotional...

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Posted on May 22, 2019 in Anxiety, Children, Children's Mental Health Awareness, Counseling, Family, Mental Health Awareness, News, Self Esteem, Social Anxiety, Social Skills, Therapy

Anxiety in Children

Anxiety under certain situations is normal. For example, when a child is taking a test or when he or she is asked to speak or perform in front of an audience – these are situations where it is normal for children to experience some anxiety. But what if a child is always worrying, always anxious? When the anxiety of a child is disproportionate to the situation it can be termed as an anxiety disorder. An anxiety disorder in children is difficult to gauge because children are not very good at expressing their problems and anxious children are usually quieter. So how do you tell if a child has an anxiety disorder? Types of Anxiety Disorders General Anxiety Disorder – This is when a child worries almost every day over everything. Other than the usual things that children worry about, like homework or tests, kids with General Anxiety Disorder tend to worry about little things like playing with friends, riding the school bus or sometimes even about greater things like...

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Posted on May 21, 2019 in Counseling, Education, Mental Health Awareness, News, Resources, Therapists, Therapy

How to Choose a Mental Health Provider

It is important to find a mental health provider who understands your unique needs and problems. If you have never sought out a mental healthcare professional, this can be a daunting task. Tips to help find the therapist you need Figure out what sort of mental health provider you need – Do you need – a therapist, a psychiatrist, a psychiatric nurse, a physician or a professional counselor. It is easier to ask for help when you know where to go to ask for help. How do you pick? If you have health insurance, you will want to pick someone from within your plan. If you are not sure of the type of mental health professional you need, your primary care physician can usually guide you in this decision. Ask for referrals – Ask your general physician for recommendations. Ask your friends and family if they have anybody they can refer. Search internet and phonebook listings. You may even contact up local mental health awareness and care organizations. Websites...

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Posted on May 8, 2019 in Mental Health Awareness, News, Psychological Testing, Therapy, Virtual Therapy

Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental health issues are very common; 1 in 5 people will experience some kind of mental illness in their lifetime. It is estimated that only 50% of people with mental illnesses receive treatment. Some of these conditions include anxiety, depression, ADHD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mental Health Awareness Month was started 70 years ago to raise awareness about mental health conditions. Mental health is essential to overall health and well-being; mental illnesses are common and treatable. Mental Illness Myths Myth: Mental illnesses are a sign of weakness Fact: Mental illnesses do are not a reflection of strength or weakness. Mental illnesses are medical disorders that need treatment. Several factors, such as genetics, brain chemistry, life experiences, trauma and family history can play a role in mental health. Myth: A mental illness is a life sentence Fact: Mental health changes over your lifetime. Many factors can change how a person feels. With treatment, some problems may be temporary. A good therapist or counselor can help you navigate the road to...

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Posted on Apr 17, 2019 in Anxiety, Bullying, Children, Counseling, Cyberbullying, News, Teens, Therapy

Coping With Teen Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying can take many forms. It could be harassment, the use of insulting or vulgar language, demeaning someone, exposing secrets or otherwise embarrassing or intimidating a person in any form. In more dangerous forms, it could result in cyber stalking or even drive the victim to depression or worse. Often, cyberbullying can cause the victims to become withdrawn, frightened, depressed and make them retreat into a shell. As a parent, you will need to look out for signs of cyberbullying and help your teen stop it before it becomes a bigger problem. Watch for signs of cyberbullying If you have a teen at home, it is quite likely they have already witnessed some form of cyberbullying, if not targeted at them, then at someone in their peer group. If your child is the receiving end of one of these online bullies, you need to first be able to identify the problem when it crops up. If your teen has suddenly become quiet, has started avoiding friends, has started locking...

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Posted on Apr 3, 2019 in Children, Counseling, Family, Parenting, Screen Time, Social Skills, Teens, Therapy, Toddlers

Screen Time: How Much Is Too Much?

Growing up, children emulate adults around them – this is no secret. In a hyper-connected world where adults seem to always be hooked to their computer and smart-device screens, it is only natural that children will demand their share of screen-time too. Often, busy parents hand over their laptops, tablets or smartphones to their children to keep them preoccupied and out of their way. Children have grown so attached to these devices that parents have now begun to use screen time as a reward or incentive for good behavior. Parenting experts are against this practice of using devices to bribe children. The American Academy of Pediatrics is against exposing children below 18 months to any kind of device usage. They may be permitted to use these devices beyond this age but only under parental supervision to consume content tailored for their age. Children in the 2-5 age group should not ideally have more than an hour of screen time per day. These precautionary rules are in place to keep...

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